HISTORY
DESCRIPTION
SITE MONUMENTS
THE MUSEUM
INFORMATION
PHOTOGALLERY
 
   
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Marmor head, probably of Zeus, that was found at Dion  
Sanctuary of Zeus Olympios
 
 
 
Sanctuary of Demeter
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
The Isis relief with corn-ears and sceptre in the hands, that was found in the Isis sanctuary at Dion  
Sanctuary of Isis
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Aerial photography of the great thermae complex at Dion  
Great thermae of Dion
The Great Thermai, that is to say the public baths of Dion, located in the south of the city where they were protected from the north winds and communicated directly with the main avenue, welcomed the stranger who entered the city, as today, through the south gate. With a spacious atrium in the centre, and public toilets, shops and workshops around the periphery, the public baths were a complex in which one could pleasurably pass one's leisure hours.
the main building was reached by crossing ...
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Aerial photography of the dionysos villa at Dion  
Villa of Dionysos
The large "Villa of Dionysos", so called from the superb mosaic with the scene from the life of the god of wine adorning the floor of the main room, was built about A.D. 200 and is still one of the most impressive building complexes in ancient Dion. Behind a row of shops and workshops along one of the secondary streets in the east side of the side of the city, next to a bath complex, the floors of which are laid with large tesserae, was a courtyard with a ionic peristyle and a well that led to the ...
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Aerial photography of the hellenistic theatre of Dion  
Ancient Theatre of Dion
The ancient theatre rests to the south of Dion, out of the city limits, having to the west the sanctuary dedicated to Demetra. Its construction dates to the Hellenistic era, probably in the reign of King Philipp V (221-179 BC).
Built on the slope of a low natural hill, the theatre is facing north-east: this is the best orientation for maximum ventilation, according to posterior instructions by Vitruvius. The architect who designed this monument exploited the morphology of the ground; through ...
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Aerial photography of the roman theatre of Dion  
Roman Theatre of Dion
The Roman theatre of Dion is located near the Hellenistic theatre, to the south-east of the latter, outside the city limits. Dating from the second century BC, it probably replaced its predecessor, which seemed to degrade after 168 BC.
Smaller than the Hellenistic theatre, it was built on flat land with a view towards the east. Its form reminds the theatres of Korinthos and Patras: a cavea of 16.45m in diameter, an orchestra of 10.70m in diameter, the scene and the proscenium. The cavea, surrounded ...
 
 
© Ministry of Culture and Sports, © 27th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
View in the funeral chamber of the macedonian tomb I at Dion  
Necropolis of Dion
The finds from the cemeteries of Dion, which are located to the north and west of the city, covered the period from abot the middle of the 5th century B.C. to the beginning of the 5th century A.D. "Hut" tombs set in enclosures of dry-stone walls, relief stelai, and funeraru altars all attest to the concern of the inhabitants about their deceased. The most imposing of the funerary stuctures, however, are the "Macedonian" tombs, which have occasionally come to light - most frequently plundered - from ...
 
 
 
Church of Agios Dimitrios at Dion
The finds from the cemeteries of Dion, which are located to the north and west of the city, covered the period from abot the middle of the 5th century B.C. to the beginning of the 5th century A.D. "Hut" tombs set in enclosures of dry-stone walls, relief stelai, and funeraru altars all attest to the concern of the inhabitants about their deceased. The most imposing of the funerary stuctures, however, are the "Macedonian" tombs, which have occasionally come to light - most frequently plundered - from ...