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The permanent exhibition of the Epigraphical Museum

Marble votiv stele to Apollon Hypakraios
Votive stele with relief wreath, dedicated to Apollo Ypakraios

This is a well-preserved example of a typical Roman votive plaque. It is divided vertically into three panels: the narrow side panels bear a relief triangle, while the central panel displays a relief myrtle wreath surrounding a votive inscription to Apollo Hypakraios separated into eight lines. This plaque was discovered in a cave on the north slope of the Akropolis, where this particular sanctuary of Apollo was located, together with a large number of similar reliefs, bearing identical inscriptions. These reliefs were dedicated by the religious and political leaders of Athens. According to the inscription, this plaque was dedicated to Apollo by Tiberius Antistius Kineas, from the deme of Koile, who served a term as archon basileus, one of the Magistrates of Athens.

Inscription:   TIB.
ANΤΙΣΤΙΟΣ
ΚΙΝΕΑΣ
ΕΚ ΚΟΙΛΗΣ
ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙ
ΥΠ' ΑΚΡΑΙΣ
ΒΑΣΙ-
ΛΕΥΣ.
Exhibit Features
Date: Roman period, End of the 1st century AC
Place of discovery: Athens, Apollon Hypakraios sanctuary, north slope of the Acropolis of Athens
Dimensions: length: 0,25 m, width: 0,05 m, height: 0,32 m
Material: pentelic marble
Inventory number: ΕΜ 8123
Exhibition hole: 3rd Hall
Copyright: Hellenic Ministry of Culture
 
 
 
  Suggestive Bibliography
 
Η ελληνική γραφή: κατάλογος έκθεσης, Αθήνα, 2003, αρ. 14
 
 
 
  See also
 
North slope of Acropolis